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Obama: Jobs plan solid

Obama: Jobs plan solid

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By PHILIP ELLIOTT and ANDREW TAYLOR

Associated Press

ALLENTOWN, Pa. -- Even as he trumpeted a slowdown in the nation's job losses Friday, President Barack Obama put finishing touches on a proposal he'll unveil next week to "jump-start" business hiring across America.

In a speech from Washington on Tuesday, Obama plans to send Congress an initial list of ideas he supports for a new jobs bill. Among the ideas he likely will endorse is the expansion of a program that gives people cash incentives to fix up their homes with energy-saving materials, two senior administration officials said.

Obama also is leaning toward new incentives, either through the tax code or other means, for small businesses that hire new workers and new spending for the construction of roads, bridges and other infrastructure, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the package, and Obama's speech, are still being crafted and could change through the weekend and beyond.

The president is open to a federal infusion of money to cash-strapped state and local governments, considered among the quickest and most effective -- though expensive -- ways to stem layoffs. But officials stressed the president likely won't mention in his speech every job-stimulating idea he will eventually support.

"We need to grow jobs and get America back to work as quickly as we can," Obama said Friday at an event at Lehigh Carbon Community College. "On Tuesday, I'm going to speak in greater detail about the ideas I'll be sending to Congress to help jump-start private sector hiring and get Americans back to work."

Job losses in the U.S. have been the worst since the 1930s, but new statistics out Friday showed a relatively moderate shedding of 11,000 jobs last month. The unemployment rate dipped from 10.2 percent in October to 10 percent in November.

The Labor Department report showed November job losses were at the smallest monthly number since the recession began.

Channeling a campaign style and an upbeat tone, Obama called it "good news just in time for the season of hope." And he said it was a sign his plans are starting to improve a battered economy.

But even with the best jobs report the country has had since 2007, Obama said the situation is still dire and in need of urgent attention. Unemployment is expected to remain high for months.

"I still consider one job lost one job too many," he said. "Good trends don't pay the rent."

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