You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Buying Guide: These realistic faux plants will convince everyone you have a green thumb
spotlight AP

Buying Guide: These realistic faux plants will convince everyone you have a green thumb

  • 0
Only $5 for 5 months
Plants

(AMAZON)

We hope you enjoy the products we recommend. We may receive a commission if you purchase a product mentioned in this article.

If you weren’t blessed with a green thumb but still love the look of indoor plants, your options are limited. While most faux plants look rubbery and less than lifelike, these realistic artificial plants give you the same look as live indoor plants—and you never have to remember when you last watered them.

1) Assorted Artificial Succulents

Thanks to their naturally waxy texture, succulents are one of the easiest artificial plants to fool people with. These realistic succulents from MyGift come in adorable geometric pots and look exactly like the real thing.

MyGift Assorted Realistic Succulent Plants in Geometric Ceramic Pots available from Amazon

2) Silk Bamboo Tree

At over 5 feet tall, this artificial bamboo tree makes an immediate impression. The natural trunks and 1,040 hyper-realistic silk leaves make this faux plant look just like a living bamboo tree. Amazon customers gave it an average of 4.6 out of 5 stars for the realistic look.

Nearly Natural Bamboo Silk Tree 64-inches available from Amazon

3) Fiddle Leaf Fig

This 22-inch fiddle leaf fig looks as realistic as a living plant according to Amazon customers who gave the artificial plant 4.5 out of 5 stars on average. The real touch waterproof leaves have a realistic and detailed coloration and texture which lends to this faux plant’s real look.

Besamenature Fiddle Leaf Fig Artificial Plant available from Amazon  

Sprout new ideas

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

  • Updated

Q: In January, my grandson and three of his friends agreed to rent a four-bedroom apartment near the campus starting in August, when school was supposed to resume. They signed the lease in January. The four students each signed separate leases (with parents co-signing), and each student put up two months of rent upfront, totaling $1,600 each.

  • Updated

My childhood home had a pedestal sink. In the wall tile, there were two tiny alcoves, one for a drinking glass and the other for hand soap. There was also a wonderful ceramic toothbrush holder with four holes that protruded from the wall. I don’t recall electric hair dryers, curling irons, or any other modern appliance back then, although a few people might have had them in the 1950s.

  • Updated

Q: In a recent column, it was stated that “nearly 80% of Americans were living paycheck to paycheck before the pandemic…” I want to know how you define living paycheck-to-paycheck, when that implies having no savings or residual discretionary cash to spend. Are you saying that necessary day-to-day living expenses consume each paycheck?

  • Updated

The first apartment: We all have one at some point, unless you’re lucky enough to be able to move straight into a well-equipped home. Furnishing an apartment and making it homey and personalized is never easy, exactly, but it’s never quite as difficult as it is in that first apartment, when all you have is empty space to fill and a first-apartment checklist (and probably not a lot of spending money).

  • Updated

Q: I need to repair the mortar joints on my older brick home that was built in the late 1800s. I’ve seen some horrible workmanship where the mortar doesn’t match at all, and I want to avoid this. How does one match the original mortar? What would you do to make sure the finished repair is nearly invisible? Is this even a realistic goal, or should I just resign myself to ugly mortar joints that don’t match? —Rhonda S., Boston

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

Weekend Things to Do